Homemade Yogurt Recipe

After years of alot of store bought yogurt disappointment (you name it, we've probably tried it), making my own homemade yogurt began following a few revelations:

#1. A mind blowing yogurt experience in Paris, France.  Quite frankly, where we live, the same European brands and quality we fell in love with abroad are not readily available locally (yet). 

#2.  An inspiring Netflix documentary series: 'Cooked' with Michal Pollan, featuring Sister Noella, the 'cheese nun'. 

#3.  The simplicity of the DIY yogurt recipe.  It's just such a no-brainer, and easy to assimilate into your routine and keep up with. 

#4.  Basic economics, it's cheap...you can't beat homemade prices.

#5.  Most importantly, it's the freshest you can get, with live bacteria cultures, and tres simple.  Your gut will thank you. 

Without going into all the intestinal benefits, I'm all about the taste, texture and simplicity, and this totally does the trick for us.  I'm still trying out new flavored variations which seem limitless....so don't forget to leave me your comments & suggestions....xS

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To begin with, you need about a cup of leftover yogurt OR a store bought culture starter.  You can buy yogurt culture starter kits (similar to yeast packets) at any number of stores.  You'll also need milk or any substitute your using.  I like to use organic ingredients for improved flavor & freshness.

Use 5g of yogurt culture starter per litre (quart) of milk.  In our house, two litres, produces enough yogurt to last us a couple weeks.   Then I do it again....

Use 5g of yogurt culture starter per litre (quart) of milk.  In our house, two litres, produces enough yogurt to last us a couple weeks.   Then I do it again....

Measure out your milk, and set aside the yogurt culture/or starter for use in the final step.  I like to use whole milk if I'm using cows milk.  You can use any milk or nut milk (almond, soy, goat, cow, coconut, cashew).  Be crazy.  Be wild.  Give it a try. 

Measure out your milk, and set aside the yogurt culture/or starter for use in the final step.  I like to use whole milk if I'm using cows milk.  You can use any milk or nut milk (almond, soy, goat, cow, coconut, cashew).  Be crazy.  Be wild.  Give it a try. 

Heat your milk slowly on medium until the temperature reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit (right before it boils), and then I take it off the heat and let it cool to 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Heat your milk slowly on medium until the temperature reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit (right before it boils), and then I take it off the heat and let it cool to 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit. 

The rich fat of the milk warming up and separating.  It looks like melted butter on top.  Beautiful. 

The rich fat of the milk warming up and separating.  It looks like melted butter on top.  Beautiful. 

Once your stove temperature reaches 180 F, remove from heat, and let the temperature cool.  Once your milk reaches 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit, add in your leftover yogurt or yogurt culture starter and mix thoroughly. 

Once your stove temperature reaches 180 F, remove from heat, and let the temperature cool.  Once your milk reaches 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit, add in your leftover yogurt or yogurt culture starter and mix thoroughly. 

Have those jars and lids, cleaned, sterilized and ready to go in advance, and then pour in your milk & yogurt culture mix.  At this point, I place all the filled jars (without their lids), into an oven tray and place clean cloth over top to cover. 

Have those jars and lids, cleaned, sterilized and ready to go in advance, and then pour in your milk & yogurt culture mix.  At this point, I place all the filled jars (without their lids), into an oven tray and place clean cloth over top to cover. 

Keep that light on.  Turn on the oven light (without turning on the oven) to generate enough warmth to incubate your yogurt. 

Keep that light on.  Turn on the oven light (without turning on the oven) to generate enough warmth to incubate your yogurt. 

Because we have a little kitchen, we have a little stove....while I go ahead and keep the gourmet kitchen dream alive.....this slightly dirty, electric baby does the trick.  Incubate your yogurt for 4-5 hours or until the yogurt has reached the desired firmness. 

Because we have a little kitchen, we have a little stove....while I go ahead and keep the gourmet kitchen dream alive.....this slightly dirty, electric baby does the trick.  Incubate your yogurt for 4-5 hours or until the yogurt has reached the desired firmness. 

Once your yogurt has reached the desired firmness, place lids on your jars and then refrigerate to stop the incubation.  For an extra thick greek yogurt, strain your yogurt through a cheese cloth (or a clean pillow case, as my husbands greek yaya used to). 

Once your yogurt has reached the desired firmness, place lids on your jars and then refrigerate to stop the incubation.  For an extra thick greek yogurt, strain your yogurt through a cheese cloth (or a clean pillow case, as my husbands greek yaya used to). 

Fresh, live, amazing, tangy flavor, so versatile (add to anything: scones, pancakes, tzatziki, salad dressing...).  Sweeten with a drizzle of maple syrup or honey.....yummmmerrss! BASIC PLAIN YOGURT RECIPE - Two litres of milk (almond, soy, nut, coconut, hemp, walnut, cow, goat...) - 10g of yogurt culture starter OR 1-2 CUPS of leftover yogurt (set aside). Clean 6-8 medium sized jars and lids and set aside.  Pour milk into a saucepan and heat slowly on medium, until the temperature reaches 180 F.  Remove from the stove and cool until the temperature reaches 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit.  Now add in your yogurt culture starter or your left over yogurt.  Mix well.  Pour into the clean sterile jars.  Place the clean jars (without lids) together in a oven tray and cover with a clean cloth.  Leave in the oven for 4-5 hours with the light on until your yogurt reaches the desired thickness.  Remove from oven.  Place on sterile lids and refrigerate to stop the incubation.  Enjoy.  Strain for added 'greek yogurt' thickness as desired.   

Fresh, live, amazing, tangy flavor, so versatile (add to anything: scones, pancakes, tzatziki, salad dressing...).  Sweeten with a drizzle of maple syrup or honey.....yummmmerrss!

BASIC PLAIN YOGURT RECIPE

- Two litres of milk (almond, soy, nut, coconut, hemp, walnut, cow, goat...)

- 10g of yogurt culture starter OR 1-2 CUPS of leftover yogurt (set aside).

Clean 6-8 medium sized jars and lids and set aside.  Pour milk into a saucepan and heat slowly on medium, until the temperature reaches 180 F.  Remove from the stove and cool until the temperature reaches 108-112 degrees Fahrenheit.  Now add in your yogurt culture starter or your left over yogurt.  Mix well.  Pour into the clean sterile jars.  Place the clean jars (without lids) together in a oven tray and cover with a clean cloth.  Leave in the oven for 4-5 hours with the light on until your yogurt reaches the desired thickness.  Remove from oven.  Place on sterile lids and refrigerate to stop the incubation.  Enjoy.  Strain for added 'greek yogurt' thickness as desired.